Tertiary education: changes needed now

By now it must feel like we are starting to beat a dead horse covering the shortcomings of the government’s tertiary education policies. However, every month new data continues to be released which strengthens our position even more. The current system appears to be slowly failing, and fees-free has done next to nothing to save it. If we want to improve tertiary education outcomes in New Zealand, the sector requires adjustments to the system beyond lowering the costs for students.

Fees-Free: Grades are out

The tertiary education sector took a swift turn to the left in late 2017, as highlighted earlier this year with the implementation of the fees-free tertiary education policy. Half a year on, and what has the policy got to show for itself? A lot of money spent, not much change to student numbers, and a complete lack of targeting skills needs.

Education 101: It’s time for a plan

The holidays are over, NCEA results are out, and school leavers are finalising their plans for the coming year – including for tertiary education. In this article, we argue that there’s more to be done in the tertiary sector than simply providing one year’s free tertiary education. We outline that the Government’s problem definition for fees-free misses the mark. Although there is scope to improve the effectiveness of the policy, we argue a national skills strategy should be next on the government’s list.

Will government rule changes have a big effect on visa approvals?

The government has been successively tightening the rules for resident visas since October 2016. The purpose of these rule changes ostensibly is to reduce the number of people moving to New Zealand while not cutting off the supply of workers for our overstretched labour market. But each set of rule changes will have very different effects for migrants on work and resident visas. In this article, we outline the rule changes and discuss the implications of these changes for migration numbers and industry stakeholders.