Chart of the Month: A Month of Maps

This month I’ve been participating in the #30DayMapChallenge – an informal event organised online for geospatial and cartographic enthusiasts to learn, practice and “have fun”. There are 30 daily prompts to inspire, and anyone who wants to can just post to their preferred social media platform (eg Twitter, Instagram, …) with the hashtag. It’s a great opportunity to get creative and try new things, without the pressure to fully polish the outputs before sharing.

Chart of the Month: Inflation highest in the North Island

Cost pressures are building across the economy, as strong demand encounters severely stretched supply chains. Businesses are being forced to raise prices to consumers as their own suppliers hike input costs. Inflation in September 2021 was 4.9% in New Zealand – the fastest in decades if you ignore the GST rise in 2011. Provincial areas of the North Island are seeing the highest price rises, as strong economic intentions hit capacity constraints.

Chart of the Month: How long until interest rate rises hit borrowers?

The Reserve Bank’s August 2021 Monetary Policy Statement made it clear that interest rates will continue to be pushed higher. Demand conditions across the New Zealand economy are strong, but supply issues are creating heightened labour market and inflationary pressures.

Chart of the Month: Who gets paid what?

Labour market pressures are building across New Zealand, with rising employment, higher job ads, practically non-existent migration, and difficulty finding workers. New Zealand’s strong levels of demand, coupled with a restricted supply (of both workers and materials), means that businesses are having to pay more for a limited pool of talent.

Chart of the Month: Could New Zealand’s chocolate sector expand?

With Easter occurring later this week, there’s an increased interest in all things chocolate. In the March 2021 Chart of the Month, we wanted to dive into the numbers and see where Sunday’s easter egg hunt might have originated from, where we make our local chocolate, and where it might eventually end up (aside from our stomachs).