Crop farming – are better growth conditions ahead?

After a few tough years, the prospects for New Zealand’s primary sector are currently looking pretty good. There is a lot of commentary going around about the potential $6 trifecta for dairy, beef and lamb prices, while kiwifruit growers and wine producers are also looking forward to continued buoyant returns. One part of the primary sector, however, that doesn’t perhaps get the coverage that it warrants is arable.

Infometrics supports Got a Trade? Got it Made! campaign

Infometrics is proud to once again sponsor the Got a Trade? Got it Made! campaign. Got a Trade? Got it Made! focuses on raising awareness of training and career opportunities in New Zealand’s trades and services. The campaign culminates in a dedicated awareness week on 21-27 August that will speak to young people, key influencers, including parents, teachers and careers advisors.

85,000 new jobs for Auckland

Auckland is New Zealand’s engine and is expected to outperform the national economy over the next four years, according to Infometrics Regional Perspectives report released today. The Infometrics Regional Perspectives report provides an outlook for economic conditions in New Zealand’s regions and industries over the next four years.

Which is New Zealand’s most creative city?

According to our Boho measure of creativity, Wellington is New Zealand’s most creative city.   The Boho measures the proportion of a city’s workforce that is involved in creative and artistic occupations and industries. Professor Richard Florida popularised the Boho measure and argued that a vibrant artistic community is a necessary condition to attract talented people to fuel the knowledge economy. 

Skills Active – using data to engage with industry

Workforce scanning and development is a key role that Industry Training Organisations (ITOs) undertake.  Skills Active Aotearoa, the ITO for the recreation, sport and exercise industries released a comprehensive Workforce Scan late last year.  The workforce scan was led by Maren Frerichs, General Manager of Industry Engagement at Skills Active.  Shaun Twaddle, Infometrics Director, had a chat with Maren to find out why they put together the workforce scan and how they went about it.

A day in the life of an economist – Nigel Pinkerton

This month we continue our series of economist interviews with a chat to Nigel Pinkerton.  With a background in economics, Nigel now concentrates on developing technologically innovative ways of delivering our services to clients. Nigel is another of our staff who has chosen to live and work away from our main offices in Wellington, and when he is not developing our web-interfaces or building our data systems, he can be found in a pair of gumboots, farming his lifestyle block in Te Awamutu.

Planning for 2017?

While many of you have enjoyed putting your feet up over recent weeks, spare a thought for Infometrics’ hardworking team. January is a busy month as we prepare to release a range of reports and data sets so that you can understand the economic backdrop for your sector or region over the year ahead. This short note outlines the key dates you need to keep in mind this month and who to get in touch with if you have any questions.

A day in the life of an economist – Shaun Twaddle

Infometrics Senior Economist Shaun Twaddle is actively involved with Got a Trade? and the industry training organisations that manage this campaign.  Shaun has worked extensively with tertiary education providers, industry training organisations, industry associations and bodies focussing on understanding the issues around workforce development, current and future workforce demands and the supply of skilled labour.

We chat with Shaun in our regular feature “A day in the life of an Economist” and ask him about his work and particular about the Got a Trade? campaign.

Ongoing opportunities in the construction sector

The construction sector experienced strong employment growth over the past five years and we expect this strong growth to continue throughout the next few years. Between March 2011 and March 2016, employment in core construction grew by 26%, compared with just 7.5% employment growth across the rest of the economy. Looking at regional data, it’s no surprise where that employment growth in the construction sector has occurred.  Auckland and Canterbury each contributed over 40% of the lift in employment, with the rest of the country responsible for just 15% of the new jobs created.